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The Goose and the Rooster

retold by Doug Lipman

A maggid - a preacher - came to a small Jewish village. After delivering a series of public lectures, he visited the town's rav - the rabbi who helped the villagers interpret the laws of the Torah.

"I have decided not to continue my wanderings," said the maggid. "I will settle in this town."

The rav was startled. "How can you expect to earn a living here, when the townspeople pay their rav so little? How could there be enough for both of us?"

The maggid said, "Let me tell you a story. There was once a farmer who kept a goose in a coop. The farmer often forgot to feed it, so the goose suffered from hunger.

"One day, the farmer bought a rooster and put it in the same coop. The goose said, 'I will starve! It's not possible for two of us to live on the small amount of food I get!'

"The rooster replied, 'Don't worry. When I'm hungry, I can crow. This will remind the farmer. Then we'll both be fed!'"

This story is presented as part of a group of two stories about abundance:

  1. The Horse's Reflection
  2. The Goose and the Rooster

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This page was last updated on Monday, March 10, 2003
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